Treatment of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury, Fibromyalgia and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Amazing results for three main pain conditions with Ketamine Neustart

For the following pain conditions, ketamine infusions can be of benefit due to the pain blocking qualities of ketamine when administered intravenously.

Complex regional pain syndrome also known as CRPS occurs in some people who have suffered a limb injury. Pain is hard to treat with standard pain treatments however ketamine infusions have been successful. Relief for inpatients lasted weeks while some outpatients reported several months of relief.

 

Great Results with Ketamine Neustart
Treating Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

For the following pain conditions, ketamine infusions can be of benefit due to the pain blocking qualities of ketamine when administered intravenously.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

Complex regional pain syndrome also known as CRPS occurs in some people who have suffered a limb injury. Pain is hard to treat with standard pain treatments however ketamine infusions have been successful. Relief for inpatients lasted weeks while some outpatients reported several months of relief.
Results showed greater success for outpatients who were receiving lower ketamine doses. This illustrated that higher doses for longer durations didn’t equate to longer-lasting pain relief. Side effects also increased for inpatients when compared to their outpatient counterparts. When factoring in the costs and resources needed for clinics with inpatients, it could be argued that the outpatient system is again showing more positive results for those with complex regional pain syndrome.

Fibromyalgia

Early studies of ketamine infusion for sufferers of fibromyalgia (also known as fibromyalgia syndrome) are encouraging. It is expected that with further studies, the correct dosage and length of the dosage will incur more significant results for fibromyalgia patients. There is a chance that further studies may also conclude that ketamine infusions aren’t the most optimal treatment option for fibromyalgia patients. It may also be determined that a higher dosage will be more beneficial.

In three studies, a low dose was given to patients. In a short dosage window of 10 to 30 minutes, patients were given 0.3 to 0.5 mg per kg. The benefits of the infusion wore off in a couple of hours for most patients.

Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

In three studies of patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, results indicated that higher doses equated with a longer lifespan of pain relief while smaller doses provided shorter periods of pain relief. Again, patients who received their doses over a more extended period reported greater relief.

All patients were given ketamine via infusions. The lower doses were limited to between 0.4 to 6 mg per kg of body weight. These were administered over short periods between 17 and 40 minutes. Patients experienced immediate relief but quickly wore off.
In the third study, patients were given higher doses over more extended periods. One patient weighing 70 kg was given 80 mg of ketamine infusions over a period of five hours. Patients receiving higher doses reported pain relief lasting up to a fortnight after the infusion.

Limited literature and extensive trials are having been completed for those with CRPS, fibromyalgia and traumatic spinal cord injuries. Once further studies and medical trials are completed, there will be more explicit protocols on how to best maximise the use of ketamine infusions for these particular conditions. Pain conditions and condition severity varies in patients. Dosage rates and lengths of dosages given need to be trialled. Additionally, analysis of costs and resources required should also be considered between outpatient and inpatient care.

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